Both HIV PEP and HIV PrEP are accessible in the entirety of our facilities

PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, is an HIV prevention method in which people who don’t have HIV take HIV medicine daily to reduce their risk of getting HIV if they are exposed to the virus. PrEP can stop HIV from taking hold and spreading throughout your body. Currently, there are only two FDA-approved medications for PrEP. PrEP is prescribed to HIV-negative adults and adolescents who are at high risk for getting HIV through sex or injection drug use. Why Take PrEP? PrEP is highly effective when taken as indicated. The once-daily pill reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than. Among people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk by more than.Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower if you combine PrEP with condoms and other prevention methods.

Is PrEP Right for You?

PrEP may benefit you if you are HIV-negative and ANY of the following apply to you:You are a gay/bisexual man and you:
have an HIV-positive partner have multiple partners, a partner with multiple partners, or a partner whose HIV status is unknown–and you also: have anal hiv pep singapore sex without a condom, or recently had a sexually transmitted infection (STI) You are a heterosexual and you: have an HIV-positive partner  have multiple partners, a partner with multiple partners, or a partner whose HIV status is unknown–and you also: don’t always use a condom for sex with people who inject drugs, or don’t always use a condom for sex with bisexual men You inject drugs and you: share needles or equipment to inject drugs are at risk for getting HIV from sex What Drugs Are Approved for PrEP? Currently, there are only two medications approved for daily use as PrEP. Both are combinations of two anti-HIV drugs in a single pill.

Emtricitabine (F)  mg in combination with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)  (F-TDF; brand name Truvada®) is recommended for all adults and adolescents at risk for HIV through sex or injection drug use. Emtricitabine (F) mg in combination with tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) (F-TAF; brand name Descovy®) is recommended for adults and adolescents at risk for HIV through sex, excluding people at risk through vaginal sex. Descovy® has not yet been studied for HIV prevention for receptive vaginal sex. Is PrEP Safe? No significant health effects have been seen in people who are HIV-negative and have taken PrEP for up to years. Some people taking PrEP may have side effects, like nausea, but these side effects are usually not serious and go away over time. If you are taking PrEP, tell your health care provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.And be aware: PrEP protects you against HIV but not against other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or other types of infections. Combining PrEP with condoms will reduce your risk of getting other STIs. If you think PrEP may be right for you, visit your doctor or health care provider. PrEP is only available by prescription. Any health care provider licensed to write prescriptions can prescribe PrEP; specialization in infectious diseases or HIV medicine is not required. If you don’t have a doctor, you can use the HIV Services Locator to find a PrEP provider and other HIV services near you. You can visit many community health centers for a PrEP consultation. Because PrEP is for people who are HIV-negative, you’ll have to get an HIV test before starting PrEP and you may need to get other tests to make sure it’s safe for you to use PrEP. If you take PrEP, you’ll need to see your healthcare provider every  months for repeat HIV tests, prescription refills, and follow-up.

How Can You Get Help Paying For PrEP?

The cost of PrEP is covered by most insurance programs and state Medicaid plans. Several medication assistance programs provide free or reduced cost PrEP to people with limited income or no insurance. If you are on Medicaid, check with your benefits counsellor. If you have health insurance but can’t afford the co-pay, you may receive co-pay assistance from drug manufacturers, state programs, or patient advocacy foundations . If you don’t have insurance, your healthcare provider can direct you to medication assistance programs that may help pay for PrEP. You can also consider enrolling in an insurance marketplace or Medicaid, if you are eligible. A patient navigator or benefits counsellor at your health clinic or health care provider’s office can often help you with this. Learn more about available manufacturer-, state-, and foundation-sponsored programs that can help pay for PrEP at PrEP is a prevention method used by people who are HIV-negative and at high risk for being exposed to HIV through sexual contact or injection drug use. When someone is exposed to HIV through sex or injection drug use, these medicines can work to keep the virus from establishing an infection. Learn more about PrEP. PEP refers to the use of antiretroviral drugs for people who are HIV-negative after a single high-risk exposure to stop HIV infection. PEP must be started as soon as possible to be effective – always within  hours of a possible exposure – and continued for weeks.

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